Cape Town 2017: Day 2

It was obvious from the noise of the TV that Premsheela was awake around 5 that Saturday morning, but until Surbhi woke up and went to the lounge to find out what Premsheela was doing, I didn’t realize she was awake too. Premsheela was already watching more Full House, and complained that we sleep too much. Surbhi argued that we’re normal people that need 8 hours of sleep, then came back to snooze. It was definitely going to be an entertaining few days.

The Cape of Good Hope was a 1.5 hour drive away from our apartment, so we left at around 9:30 that morning after having a bite to eat i.e. some of the humongous bran muffin I had bought on the flight. I have no idea what Premsheela ate (though now that I think about it, it was probably chocolate), but Surbhi and I shared the muffin.

The Beach

There are so many gorgeous beaches and viewpoints on the way from the city to the Cape of Good Hope that we couldn’t help but stop somewhere – just before Simon’s Town. We just wanted to take a few pictures, but Premsheela went all the way down to the water and decided to take off her shoes. Surbhi and I eventually gave in and decided to join her. We ended up spending at least an hour playing around in the ice cold water of the Atlantic. The water was so cold that my feet felt as though I was being stabbed with hot daggers.

We left once we were satisfied with the spontaneous frolicking in the water, sandy feet and all.

Cape Point

We got to the Cape of Good Hope around midday and hiked all the way up to the lighthouse rather than taking the funicular. Premsheela marched ahead of us – I think her energy comes from all that chocolate she eats. She really is a chocolate queen. We wanted to take a group selfie with the lighthouse in the background, but as you can see, she was already too far ahead to even hear us properly.

If you’ve ever been to Cape Point, you’d know that it is insanely windy. I think I spent as much time trying to control my hair as I did doing that climb. Of course, even when we only had one shot at a photo of all 3 of us with Cape Point in the background, my hair couldn’t give a damn.

After admiring the views from the lighthouse, Surbhi wanted to take the Lighthouse Keeper’s Trail which is a path that takes you along a sheer cliff-face below the old, more well-known lighthouse, to the new one which Surbhi’s head is blocking in the above photo. I wasn’t too sure about doing it because of the time and also because the sign said it was a 1.5 hour hike there and back. After a little thought I decided to do it because I figured we’d never come there again, at least not together, and I hadn’t done it before either. I let the girls go ahead as I stopped to take photos. Many times. The path was on the right side of the cliff because there was absolutely no wind at all. It was absolutely silent, and all we could see was False Bay below us and the Cape Peninsula encompassing it. It was other-worldly.

The hike back up was…challenging. But everyone knows I my fitness levels are in the negative, so it shouldn’t be surprising. It wasn’t that bad though, I just stopped here and there to breathe and I was fine after that.

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Premsheela wanted to walk back down whereas Surbhi wanted to take the funicular just so she could experience it. She’s like me in more ways than one, and this was just another example of how similar we are. I totally understood her desire to go on it, and I myself wanted to use it too cos I really had had enough of the wind. Premsheela carried on down the same path we had climbed earlier, and Surbhi and I went to find out the cost of the tickets for the funicular. When the guy told us the price, we weren’t impressed as it was just one way and didn’t really want to spend more money unnecessarily. When we turned to leave, he told us he’d do us a favour and charge us only for one ticket, as long as we gave him the money discreetly. We figured we’d take up the opportunity because heck, why not? He then opened the “special entrance” for us and let us through, bypassing all the other people who were queuing. I think he felt bad when he saw our expressions after hearing the price – it was very kind of him. I felt good knowing that someone local had been s0 kind to us, especially to my foreign friend.

Surbhi and I were starving so since we couldn’t see Premsheela (we assumed she was still walking down), we each bought a muffin and something to drink (cappuccino for Surbhi, Appletiser for me) from the shop next to the restaurant overlooking False Bay. Muffins, especially bran or blueberry ones, had become our thing because ever since the flight, it was something we’d share.

I was the designated driver since the girls don’t know how to drive (yet), so I couldn’t eat. Surbhi is without a doubt the best passenger I’ve had. When we were on our way to Cape Point in the morning, she held out a handful of chips for me to take from, and when we left for Hout Bay after getting our muffins, she broke pieces off of it so that I could just grab it without having to struggle or even look away from the road. She did the same with pieces of chocolate too. It’s the little things. Thanks Surbhi.

Hout Bay

Hout Bay is around 40 minutes back towards the city from Cape Point and we headed straight for it. I didn’t actually know what we were going to do apart from enjoying Chapman’s Peak drive and the views of Hout Bay itself. I was also hoping to have some fish from Mariner’s Wharf, the local restaurant in the harbour, but I wasn’t sure if I would be able to since both girls are vegetarian and I would have felt bad to have something non-vegetarian. I didn’t say anything about it though.

Minutes after we arrived at the Hout Bay harbour, Surbhi asked if I want to have the fish. I was surprised because it was as if she had read my mind. I said yes, but that we should walk around a little. We really thought it was going to rain because there were threatening clouds behind us. In fact, there was a different weather pattern in every direction we turned, so we basically just followed the light.

After taking in the views and a bunch of silly selfies (we went a little mad at one point), we started walking back until Surbhi again asked if I want to have the fish. I couldn’t say no, but I knew she hadn’t eaten either so asked if they would both sit down and have at least some chips with me. They actually just wanted to play in the water again, so me having the fish I so wanted was the perfect opportunity for them. I didn’t mind at all, since I’d be able to sit outside where I could see them.

The fish was to die for – it was as fresh as I expected it to be. It was just battered hake, nothing fancy, and chips. Mariner’s Wharf now also makes their own craft beer called Olde Seadog Beer which is a must. I’m glad I could give it a try because it was so worth it. If Surbhi and Premsheela weren’t real friends, I would have felt bad sitting there eating alone, but that didn’t happen even once. You can tell when people are genuine, and these two girls are. It might seem insignificant, but when a friend warmly smiles and waves at you, it says a thousand words.

We didn’t spend too long in Hout Bay, probably just over an hour. I suppose we could have done more but I myself wasn’t too familiar with what the place had to offer apart from the stunning views. Anyway, I wasn’t keen on driving back at night since I wasn’t familiar with the roads.

We made our way back to the city and something I just had to do was see the sunset from Camps Bay. I had done it when I was last in Cape Town in 2008, and I just had to see it again. It’s funny, I’ve never seen a sunrise in my home town of Durban, but I’ve seen several sunsets in other parts of the world.

We approached the city from the Camps Bay side and had the most stunning views of Table Mountain and Lions Head.

We got to Camps Bay beach not long after, and it was surprising how easy it was for me to get a parking right next to the promenade. We were just in time for the sunset.

Punjab Wok

My best friend Sophia suggested Punjab Wok for us to have supper at – she rates it higher than Bukhara, which is quite something considering it’s the most top rated Indian restaurant in Cape Town. Punjab Wok is near where she lives, in Century City, so she agreed to meet us there. I had been wanting to visit her in Cape Town for several years but I always ended up doing something else. I guess the time just wasn’t right.

Sophia’s mom was visiting from Durban and at the last minute, Sophia had to shuffle plans around, so she could only meet us for around 10 minutes. It was fine though, the main thing was that we’d see her and that Premsheela would eat something. We weren’t sure exactly where the restaurant was so took a few minutes trying to figure out where to park. As we were walking towards where we figured the restaurant might be, we passed one called Tiger’s Milk. Really now, why on earth would you name a restaurant Tiger’s Milk? It looked like a really cool place though – I think I’ll give it a try next time.

Once we got to the restaurant, we just ordered some starters while waiting for Sophia. She arrived full of smiles and energy only 15 or so minutes later. If there’s ever a friend who can light up a room, it’s Sophia. In the short time we spent with her, she took us through the entire menu telling us what was good (everything, pretty much) and asked what we had gotten up to. She asked whether we had gone to Boulders Beach to see the penguins, since we had gone to Simon’s Town. I didn’t realise at all that Boulders Beach was in Simon’s Town (I know) and I knew Premsheela wouldn’t stop asking for me to take her to see the penguins until I did.

Sophia is a regular at Punjab Wok so when the waiter and manager came to say that they’re closing the kitchen at 9pm, she was not impressed. It was only around 8:30. She firmly told them that she knows they just want to go home and that the kitchen does not close at 9, especially when there are customers, so they must not irritate us and should let us order whenever we feel like. They agreed to close the kitchen at 9:30, but even after Sophia left (she also had a quick word with them at the counter), they continuously came to our table to ask whether or not we wanted to order anything more. I eventually asked the manager whether he was telling the couple in the corner the same thing because I don’t see him going to their table as often as he was coming to ours. He said that he did tell them; he knew I was irritated. It’s one thing when you can’t get a waiter’s attention, but when he keeps coming every 5-7 minutes, it becomes annoying as hell. So annoying, in fact, that the 3 of us ended up hurling swear words at him in Hindi with full blown smiles on our faces. I’m sure he thought we were complimenting him. I loved it because since there was only one (white) couple in the restaurant, apart from the girls, no one could understand what I was saying and I could say it at full volume.

When the waiter brought the bill at 9:25, Premsheela couldn’t help but ask what the chai ice cream was, just to have a final dig at him since it was close to the time that they said the kitchen is going to close. He then left the bill on our table and went back to the front desk. We told him that we were going to pay cash, but he didn’t come back. Premsheela wanted to walk out (just to mess with them) but Surbhi and I were scared to push it that far. We ended up just getting up and paying at the front desk. Once we went out of the door, the waiter asked us whether or not we were going to come back. I wanted to just say no and walk away, but I decided to moderate my response by saying “We don’t live here, so I doubt it”. I will probably go back at some point though, but when I’m with Sophia.

We walked away laughing and calling him more insulting names because we actually felt free after leaving the restaurant. The food was good by the way; it was the service that needed help.

It took us longer to get home than we expected because the car’s GPS took us into some dodgy part of the city. I had a bad feeling about it when we took one of the turns, and ended up using Google Maps on my phone to get us out of there. On the way, Surbhi spotted a sign on a building that said “Cape Town”, but because of the font, it looked like “Tape Town”. Let’s just say that was Premsheela’s trigger and for the rest of the night, even till today, everything is “tape”. We are tapey girls; that thing is tape; that person is tape; tape is bisexual because it’s not a straight tape. It was absolutely crazy and Surbhi and I were in stitches.

Did I mention I knew it was going to be an entertaining holiday?

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